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Posts tagged Nature

Fire tornados in the Australian Outback

#Fire #nature #outback #Australia

Cool photoshoot!

(via LikeCool)

Cool photoshoot!

(via LikeCool)

#Nature

This is beautiful!


(via LikeCool)

#Beauty #nature #*creation*

Cool lil Madagascar Chameleon:

Scientists have recently discovered four new chameleon species, which rank among the world’s tiniest reptiles, called Brookesia micra - on a small islet just off the main island of Madagascar. At 29mm long, it fits comfortably on the head of a matchstick.

(via LikeCool)

Cool lil Madagascar Chameleon:

Scientists have recently discovered four new chameleon species, which rank among the world’s tiniest reptiles, called Brookesia micra - on a small islet just off the main island of Madagascar. At 29mm long, it fits comfortably on the head of a matchstick.

(via LikeCool)

#Africa #Madagascar #animals #nature #chameleon #cute

The golden orb spider (Nephila madagascariensis) spins a unique silk, naturally gold in color. Last week, it made a memorable debut in the fashion world. 
London’s Victoria and Albert Museum put on display a remarkable cape woven from silk extracted from about 1.2 million female spiders in the highlands of Madagascar, an island off Africa’s southeastern coast. The project was the work of English textile expert Simon Peers [left] and U.S. designer Nicholas Godley [right].
For three years, dozens of workers collected spiders every morning and harnessed them 24 at a time into special “milking” contraptions that allowed workers to extract their silk. The museum notes that it takes about 23,000 extractions to create one ounce of silk thread. 
Animal lovers, note: At the end of a day’s milking, the spiders were returned to the wild. 
Under Peers’s and Godley’s direction, the spun silk was hand-woven into fabric, then elaboratedly embroidered with a design inspired by 19th-century illustrations featuring —what else? — spiders [detail below]. A video on the museum’s Web site, www.vam.co.uk, shows the process.
The result is a cape 13 feet long, which was modeled at the museum last week and will remain on display until June 5. Undyed, it has an intense, sunny yellow color and is described as much lighter and softer than fabric made from the silk of silkworms.

 (via LikeCool)

The golden orb spider (Nephila madagascariensis) spins a unique silk, naturally gold in color. Last week, it made a memorable debut in the fashion world.
London’s Victoria and Albert Museum put on display a remarkable cape woven from silk extracted from about 1.2 million female spiders in the highlands of Madagascar, an island off Africa’s southeastern coast. The project was the work of English textile expert Simon Peers [left] and U.S. designer Nicholas Godley [right].
For three years, dozens of workers collected spiders every morning and harnessed them 24 at a time into special “milking” contraptions that allowed workers to extract their silk. The museum notes that it takes about 23,000 extractions to create one ounce of silk thread.
Animal lovers, note: At the end of a day’s milking, the spiders were returned to the wild.
Under Peers’s and Godley’s direction, the spun silk was hand-woven into fabric, then elaboratedly embroidered with a design inspired by 19th-century illustrations featuring —what else? — spiders [detail below]. A video on the museum’s Web site, www.vam.co.uk, shows the process.
The result is a cape 13 feet long, which was modeled at the museum last week and will remain on display until June 5. Undyed, it has an intense, sunny yellow color and is described as much lighter and softer than fabric made from the silk of silkworms.

(via LikeCool)

#Fashion #nature #silk #spiders

Crazy how much America gets it in the neck from nature these days. Terrible devastation in Joplin, MO.
(via Deadly tornadoes strike again - The Big Picture - Boston.com)

Crazy how much America gets it in the neck from nature these days. Terrible devastation in Joplin, MO.

(via Deadly tornadoes strike again - The Big Picture - Boston.com)

#america #tornadoes #joplin #MO #Joplin MO #nature

OK, this is the saddest nature story I’ve ever read! Who would have thought a high pitched voice is this dangerous when you’re a whale. Shame, poor thing.
erickimberlinbowley:

The Loneliest Whale in the World.
In 2004, The New York Times wrote an article about the loneliest whale in the world. Scientists have been tracking her since 1992 and they discovered the problem:
She isn’t like any other baleen whale. Unlike all other whales, she doesn’t have friends. She doesn’t have a family. She doesn’t belong to any tribe, pack or gang. She doesn’t have a lover. She never had one. Her songs come in groups of two to six calls, lasting for five to six seconds each. But her voice is unlike any other baleen whale. It is unique—while the rest of her kind communicate between 12 and 25hz, she sings at 52hz. You see, that’s precisely the problem. No other whales can hear her. Every one of her desperate calls to communicate remains unanswered. Each cry ignored. And, with every lonely song, she becomes sadder and more frustrated, her notes going deeper in despair as the years go by.
Just imagine that massive mammal, floating alone and singing—too big to connect with any of the beings it passes, feeling paradoxically small in the vast stretches of empty, open ocean.

OK, this is the saddest nature story I’ve ever read! Who would have thought a high pitched voice is this dangerous when you’re a whale. Shame, poor thing.

erickimberlinbowley:

The Loneliest Whale in the World.

In 2004, The New York Times wrote an article about the loneliest whale in the world. Scientists have been tracking her since 1992 and they discovered the problem:

She isn’t like any other baleen whale. Unlike all other whales, she doesn’t have friends. She doesn’t have a family. She doesn’t belong to any tribe, pack or gang. She doesn’t have a lover. She never had one. Her songs come in groups of two to six calls, lasting for five to six seconds each. But her voice is unlike any other baleen whale. It is unique—while the rest of her kind communicate between 12 and 25hz, she sings at 52hz. You see, that’s precisely the problem. No other whales can hear her. Every one of her desperate calls to communicate remains unanswered. Each cry ignored. And, with every lonely song, she becomes sadder and more frustrated, her notes going deeper in despair as the years go by.

Just imagine that massive mammal, floating alone and singing—too big to connect with any of the beings it passes, feeling paradoxically small in the vast stretches of empty, open ocean.

(Source: erickimberlinbowley, via lovepeaceandtruth-deactivated20)

#whale #nature

An Amazing World

It really is. Anyone not aware of this fact is simply dull, I’m afraid.


Cumulonimbus Cloud Over Africa

You can look into the furthest corners of what we know about this place in which we dwell, and you will be constantly surprised and amazed - whether hearing about the latest technologies that humans have imagined for medical or other uses, to seeing photos of a microscopic scale of everyday creatures like flies and ants. Or as here, seeing the coolest stuff NASA has seen around the universe.

Have a look at the link, and enjoy some interesting and different views of this world of ours. While you look, just give a thought to the things that are there, that we haven’t yet seen. This is all the word of a God that enjoys life, and has fun. If you can’t be sure of a God that has fun, I refer you to these specimens here (please take special note of the ‘Aye-Aye’ and picture anyone creating that without a huge grin on their face).  


This is a normal photograph of “Aurora Australis”. Truly amazing things happen in nature. Who needs artists and science fiction, eh?

See the Exceptional NASA Pictures on abduzeedo.com here

#NASA #nature #planet earth #space #my original musings