#musings
HomeAbout ▾ Ask me anything ▾Search ▾ArchiveSubscribeMy Own Posts (No Reblogs)My iOS App ProgressMy PhotosMy DesignMy CompanyMy Tag Cloud

Posts tagged Robots


Theresa Klein talks about Achilles, the first machine to move in a biologically accurate way.  
“Our robot, named Achilles, is the first to walk in a biologically accurate way. That means it doesn’t just move like a person, but also sends commands to the legs like the human nervous system does.
Each leg has eight muscles—Kevlar straps attached to a motor on one end and to the plastic skeleton on the other. As the motor turns, it pulls the strap, mimicking the way our muscles contract. Some of Achilles’ muscles extend from the hip or thigh to the lower leg so they can project forces all the way down the limb. This allows us to put most of the motors in the hips and thighs. Placing them up high keeps the lower leg light, so that it can swing quickly like a human’s lower leg.
In people, neurons in the spinal column send out rhythmic signals that control our legs. It’s like a metronome, and sensory feedback from the legs alters the pace. Your brain can step in to make corrections, but it doesn’t explicitly control every muscle, which is essentially why you can walk without thinking about it. For our robot, a computer program running off an external PC controls movement in a similar way. With each step, the computer sends a signal to flex one hip muscle and extend the other. The computer changes the timing of those signals based on feedback from the legs’ load and angle sensors. A similar control system handles the lower muscles.
Modeling human movement has applications outside of robotics. It could also help us understand how people recover after spinal-cord injuries, for example. But our robot is still a very simplified model—it has no torso and can’t handle complex terrain. Initially, we also had a problem with its feet slipping. We thought about different types of rubber to give its feet more grip but eventually realized a solution already exists. Now, the robot wears a pair of Keds.”


Robotics fascinate me, but not for the obvious reason that it’s just generally awesome. What amazes me is when you see robotic bodies, you realize how strange it is that our bodies are so efficient - if you think of the precise control your fingers have - how much accuracy you can really achieve - but then take a finger, and squish it around a bit. Feel how loose and squishy out muscles and skin is - that’s what gives us our ability to hold odd-shaped items - but it’s so opposite to how humans think. We (used to) try and make robots with precise vise-like grips that seal perfectly, but it turns out that this doesn’t really work as well as our funny squishy hands.Isn’t that odd and amazing?Love that the robot just wears normal shoes!

Theresa Klein talks about Achilles, the first machine to move in a biologically accurate way.

“Our robot, named Achilles, is the first to walk in a biologically accurate way. That means it doesn’t just move like a person, but also sends commands to the legs like the human nervous system does.

Each leg has eight muscles—Kevlar straps attached to a motor on one end and to the plastic skeleton on the other. As the motor turns, it pulls the strap, mimicking the way our muscles contract. Some of Achilles’ muscles extend from the hip or thigh to the lower leg so they can project forces all the way down the limb. This allows us to put most of the motors in the hips and thighs. Placing them up high keeps the lower leg light, so that it can swing quickly like a human’s lower leg.

In people, neurons in the spinal column send out rhythmic signals that control our legs. It’s like a metronome, and sensory feedback from the legs alters the pace. Your brain can step in to make corrections, but it doesn’t explicitly control every muscle, which is essentially why you can walk without thinking about it. For our robot, a computer program running off an external PC controls movement in a similar way. With each step, the computer sends a signal to flex one hip muscle and extend the other. The computer changes the timing of those signals based on feedback from the legs’ load and angle sensors. A similar control system handles the lower muscles.

Modeling human movement has applications outside of robotics. It could also help us understand how people recover after spinal-cord injuries, for example. But our robot is still a very simplified model—it has no torso and can’t handle complex terrain. Initially, we also had a problem with its feet slipping. We thought about different types of rubber to give its feet more grip but eventually realized a solution already exists. Now, the robot wears a pair of Keds.”

Robotics fascinate me, but not for the obvious reason that it’s just generally awesome. What amazes me is when you see robotic bodies, you realize how strange it is that our bodies are so efficient - if you think of the precise control your fingers have - how much accuracy you can really achieve - but then take a finger, and squish it around a bit. Feel how loose and squishy out muscles and skin is - that’s what gives us our ability to hold odd-shaped items - but it’s so opposite to how humans think. We (used to) try and make robots with precise vise-like grips that seal perfectly, but it turns out that this doesn’t really work as well as our funny squishy hands.

Isn’t that odd and amazing?

Love that the robot just wears normal shoes!

(via howstuffworks)

#one more squishy in there and i'll start losing followers i know #robots

Look At This Robot With Real Muscles

(via Co.Design)

Look At This Robot With Real Muscles

(via Co.Design)

#Robots

More support for my theory that they replaced Victoria Beckham with a robot at some point… she has, after all, had the same facial expression for a half a decade now…
Look how it can turn it’s head in a lifelike fashion and even focus it’s eye cameras on nearby objects.
Version 2 we expect to introduce voice…

More support for my theory that they replaced Victoria Beckham with a robot at some point… she has, after all, had the same facial expression for a half a decade now…

Look how it can turn it’s head in a lifelike fashion and even focus it’s eye cameras on nearby objects.

Version 2 we expect to introduce voice…

#victoria beckham #robots #victoria beckham is a robot #conspiracy theories